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A host of firsts await Finn Harps in the future

September 5, 2021 Leave a comment

Published in the Finn Harps match day programme – Issue 13 2021 – Finn Harps v Shamrock Rovers

There is something special about the first time. Tunde Owolabi fired home his first hat-trick for Finn Harps recently with the Belgian bagging all three goals in the 3-1 win over St. Patrick’s Athletic.

“What an insane night,” was how Owolabi described it on twitter afterward with a couple of on fire emojis also included and sure why not! “Feels like a dream. Super delighted with my first hat-trick for the club. The boys were unbelievable tonight. We are on [fire emoji]. Thank you for your wonderful support…the atmosphere was absolutely electric.”

It was a different type of temperature and atmosphere when Jason Colwell scored in Finn Park back in 1999 for what was his first goal for Shamrock Rovers. Colwell came from a staunch Shamrock Rovers supporting family – his father Joe was Rovers’ chairman and both Colwells were part of the club in the difficult years when the Tallaght project was stalled for a long period.

Jason joined the Hoops after several seasons with UCD and he got his first goal for Rovers on a Ballybofey pitch blanketed in snow in mid-April 1999.

“My first goal for Rovers was up in Finn Park in a rescheduled mid-week match,” said Colwell when he spoke recently to this writer. “It was snowing, we played with an orange ball and I scored with a diving header! Out of everything that shouldn’t be, it was, because I wouldn’t have scored too many headers [at five foot seven] and I wouldn’t have played too many times in snow with an orange ball! 

“We lost the game though so it didn’t really count for much. Probably nobody else remembers it but I’ll always remember it because it was my first goal for Rovers.”

A look back through the records shows that Harps won the game 4-1 with James Mulligan scoring twice, along with a goal from Eamonn Kavanagh with Peter Murray scoring an own goal putting the ball by Rovers ‘keeper Tony O’Dowd.

Colwell had the frustration of seeing a partially built stand in Tallaght Stadium lay idle during his playing career with the club. And his thoughts may be echoed by Harps players and supporters alike as the wait on further developments on the new ground in Stranorlar – although there was good news on that front earlier in the year with the government allocating a provisional grant of close to €4m for the project.

“We could see the stand being built and we were training on the pitch so we thought we’d be playing there soon but it didn’t happen,” said Colwell. “It’s a shame that the years I was playing we didn’t have our own ground but to have Tallaght now – I hope the players know how fortunate they are because plenty who went before them weren’t afforded that.”

Last week in the North West derby Owulabi got the winner in Harps’ first ever FAI Cup victory over Derry City. When the new stadium comes for Harps, the first goal and the first derby win will be massive events for the club. 

For Shamrock Rovers supporters the first win over Bohemians in Tallaght Stadium back in 2009 has gone down in history. Stephen Rice, the newly appointed Republic of Ireland senior men’s team chief scout and opposition analyst, was part of that Hoops team who somehow conjured a late win over the Gypsies who were leading 1-0 with a couple of minutes to go in that game in May 2009. 

“If anyone says to me ‘the Bohs game’ – and I’ve played in I don’t know how many Rovers v Bohs games – I know the one they are talking about,” said Rice. “It is always the first one in Tallaght. It was a great night with Gary Twigg getting real poacher’s goals. 

“Typical Twiggy, out of nowhere he got two goals in the 88th and 89th minutes to win the game. When the first goal went in you could see the crowd went off the wall. When that winning goal went in, it was unbelievable.” 

Rovers rowing in the right direction – Liam Scales interview

Published in Hoops Scene No. 13 / 2021 (Shamrock Rovers v KF Teuta Durres / Longford Town)

In a four week period, the Hoops will play across four different competitions – League of Ireland, FAI Cup, Champions League and Europa Conference League. So plenty of football to concentrate on for the Shamrock Rovers players. Getting a break away from the game is also important so enjoying the July heat wave with some sea swimming and golf while watching the Olympics has been a nice distraction for Hoops player Liam Scales.

The interest in the watching events from Tokyo is heightened for the 22-year-old as a number of the athletes with Team Ireland were on scholarship with Scales during his time at UCD. Not only that, the Hoops defender lived in first year with Paul O’Donovan, one of just eight Irish Olympians to have won a gold medal.

“The sports scholarship I was on at UCD wasn’t just the football scholarship but included other sports,” said Scales. “There are good few from that scholarship system who are out at the Olympics including swimmer Darragh Greene in the breaststroke (the Ireland record holder at 50m, 100m and 200m), Lena Tice is on the hockey team (and an Irish international cricket player) and I lived with Paul O’Donovan in first year in college.

“He is an insane athlete. Living with him, I could see the amount of work he put in, eating the right food and all the hours he spent in training. I would have seen him in the gym training beside us. He would be on the rowing machine going flat out and often he’d end up going over to the bin to throw up. The rowers push themselves to the limit and they can’t do anymore.”

While sea swimming has become very common during coronavirus times, Scales has always been fond of a dip in the Irish Sea. “Being from Brittas Bay, I’m well used to the sea. I enjoy sea swimming. It is not like I’m forcing myself to hop in only for recovery. Even if I wasn’t playing, I’d do it anyway but it is still great for as part of my recovery with football. It is like an ice bath and I always feel much better after.

“On the days off you have to be able to take your mind off football so I love sea swimming and I play golf with a few of the lads in the squad too. With the lockdown we have had a tough few months where you couldn’t do much but now the golf courses are open it is good to be able to enjoy yourself on the days off. With the weather we’ve had in the last few weeks, we have made the most of it but with football in the mind we haven’t done too much.”

On the pitch, Scales has been one of the standout players for the Hoops this season who sit top of the table in the League of Ireland. Coming into the UEFA Europa Conference League home qualifier against Teuta, he has played in every game so far this season starting all bar the recent 2-0 cup win over Galway United. In that match, he made a substitute appearance for the final half an hour of Rovers’ 20th win in a row over United.

“The first half goals were taken really well,” said Scales about the strikes from Rory Gaffney and Dylan Watts. “We controlled the first half. With John Caulfield in charge (of Galway), you have to expect a reaction from them like we saw in the second half. To be fair to them, they came out and had a proper go in the second half, creating a couple of chances. 

“I think overall we were comfortable and happy enough. It would have been nice to go and dominate the second half like we did in the first but it is rare that games work out like that. It is all about getting through to the next round and the draw for that means we are  really looking forward to playing Bohs.

“We have lots of games to focus on between then and now but if you want to win the cup, you have to play big games,be it last-16 stage, quarter-final or semi-final. You are going to have to play the likes of Bohs, Dundalk or Pat’s and win those type of ties if you want to win the cup. 

“We have a big European tie before then and tough league games too but we are looking forward to playing Bohs down the line and hopefully get the same result the lads got a couple of years ago in the semi-final when they went on to win the cup.

“It is nice to be in the team every week but I know I need to keep playing well and working hard as the competition is so strong. When you look at our bench, there are players who would be playing week-in week-out in the league with other teams. I’ve been playing between centre-half and wing-back and that is helping me be picked as I can slot in for either position. If I want to keep playing every week, I have to keep up my form and stay fit.

“I’ve scored twice this year, both against Dundalk and they are two of the best goals that I’ve scored in my senior career. As a kid I would have played higher up the pitch in midfield or as a winger and scored a few goals. Playing as a wingback you can get into these higher positions and every now and again there is going to be a chance that will fall to you. It is about taking it. I’ve been in the right place at the right time to score those goals this season. It is nice to chip in with a couple of goals and assists.”

Rovers come into their home European tie three points clear at the top of the table having won four matches in a row in all competitions – including last week’s 3-1 win over St. Patrick’s Athletic – putting behind them a difficult period when, struggling with an injury crisis, they earned only eight points from the 21 on offer in the league. 

“We went through a tough spell in June. We lost a couple of games after being on that long winning streak. To lose a couple of games in a month was tough. We bounced back really well from that. The spirit is high. We have players back from injury and Richie (Towell) has come in and done really well. It is all positive in the camp at the moment. It is such an important busy month in August and so it is a good time for us to be kicking into form and playing well. 

“Last year when we were winning every week and on that streak of unbeaten games, we always just took it game by game. We never looked beyond our next game. That is all we can do now especially with so many games coming up. This isn’t time to be thinking about different games, only the one coming up. We have been in this situation before. Every year the schedule gets hectic when Europe and the cup is around. Hopefully we can stay on top of it, stay fit and go on another run.”

Joey O’Brien: ‘I wanted to win the league. I wanted to win the cup. I wanted to put the club back at the top’

Published in Hoops Scene (Shamrock Rovers v Sligo Rovers May 2021)

There have been plenty of crucial late goals this season that have helped propel the Hoops top of the league and cement the record run of games undefeated in League of Ireland history but for Shamrock Rovers defender Joey O’Brien a few run of the mill wins built on the back of clean sheets would do just as nicely.

“It is always something we talk about in the dressing room that clean sheets win leagues,” said O’Brien. “It is obviously great to get last minute winners. We know if we can get a clean sheet, a win will be easier as the lads are going to score goals. 

“The foundation at the back allows you to be in the game and control the game. A single goal can win you the game with that clean sheet. We would like to get a few more this year. Come the end of the season, the team with the most clean sheets will probably win the league.

“It has gone on so long across three seasons,” said O’Brien about the record of undefeated games for Rovers. When the Hoops hit 31 unbeaten following the win in Finn Harps, they beat a record that had stood since 1927.  “It is a great achievement but it is probably something that you will only look back on in years to come as at the minute it is just on to the next game and the next game. 

“To be honest there isn’t much talk on it in the dressing room. Let’s just win the game in front of you and that is what we were at. It isn’t about keeping the run going. It is about winning what is in front of you. Keep rolling on to the next game.”

It took an injury time winner for Rovers to earn all three points against St. Patrick’s Athletic in Richmond Park, while Rory Gaffney’s goal on the back of a quickly taken throw in from Liam Scales got the Hoops a point last time out here in Tallaght.

“You can’t beat a last minute winner,” said O’Brien about Danny Mandroiu’s goal against the Saints. “It was a tough hard game against Pats. Tackles were flying in. It is a local derby so it makes the win that bit sweeter. It was first against second in the league which added to it and made the win that bit more important.”

The current Shamrock Rovers squad is one that has been created by Stephen Bradley since he took up the Head Coach role at Rovers. The acquisition of O’Brien in 2018 was a crucial one – bringing in a player with both Premier League and international football experience but just as important a player with a driven attitude who is a crucial member of the leadership group in the squad.

“I wanted to win the league. I wanted to win the cup. I wanted to put the club back at the top,” said O’Brien about his ambitions on signing for the club. “That was it. Nothing else. Speaking to the manager when I first came in, that was why I came here. 

“I maybe didn’t realise how far off we were at the start. We weren’t really near the top then. We were qualifying for Europe but there was Dundalk and Cork battling each other and we were below that. 

“You could see the change in the team with the players who left and those who came in. There has been a huge turnover in players since I came to the club. The quality has come into the group and players have improved and improved. 

“The manager has changed the system of play and that has really benefited us. He has brought in really good players who have really fitted into the system. It has been really good over the last 18 months and more from when we won the cup. 

“That was a huge turning point for us,” said O’Brien about the team winning the FAI Cup in 2019 beating Dundalk on penalties in the Aviva Stadium  – the first Rovers side to achieve that success in 32 years. “Winning the cup was a massive massive moment. There is no hiding from that. 

“The club had waited so long. The size of this club and the magnitude of this football club, the players realised how long it was. On cup final day, you could see how big the crowd was, the outpouring of emotion, to see fans who had waited so long or those that had never seen us win the cup. 

“That gave the players in the group a huge amount of satisfaction and enjoyment. But also confidence in our ability – we were the team that ended that cup drought. A huge part of football is the having the confidence to go out and to excel. We got that from the cup final and it rolled on to the following season. 

“It isn’t just being about an older player going around as an older voice of having seen it and done it,” said O’Brien about the leadership dynamic in the Rovers squad. “You don’t really want that. It is about creating the right environment in the dressing room where there are no issues. No cliques.

“If there are any issues, you want the younger lads to be comfortable and confident to go and speak to one of the senior players. You have the experience in the dressing room but it isn’t authoritarian and that these lads are the main men who run it. It isn’t like that. It means you are there to give guidance if you are asked and if there is something that is worrying them. It means you’ve been there and can offer them some advice on how to handle it.

“I am an older player so my life experience is different. I’m going home to play with my kids whereas they younger lads are going home to play on their PlayStation. What you have in common is playing football and the dressing room. 

“The competitiveness and intensity of training are things that will never change. The older lads in the group probably do demand more in training, we put the demand of each other. That then leads on to match day.”

After last Friday’s visit to Oriel Park, the Hoops welcome Sligo Rovers to Tallaght Stadium this evening. When the teams last met a Rory Gaffney deflected shot off John Mahon two minutes from time earned the Hoops a draw. O’Brien knows this evening’s game will be difficult against the Bit O’ Red. 

“I’ve always had a lot of time for Liam Buckley looking at his teams from the outside. Looking at the level and clubs that he played at and also his Pats team and how he had them play. Even now at Sligo you can see how he has changed them. He has brought in some really good players and he has improved the squad. They are right in the race. Sligo have done really well. 

“It will be a tough game and that has been the case when we have played the last few times. The scorelines maybe haven’t reflected the game. They have been a lot tighter games than the final outcome.”

Toasting a Harps win and a Rovers title win

Published in the official Finn Harps match day programme Issue 4/2021 (Finn Harps v Shamrock Rovers)

There has always been a good relationship between Finn Harps and Shamrock Rovers dating right back to when the Hoops provided the opposition in 1969 for Harps’ first League of Ireland game. As a Shamrock Rovers fan I’ve always enjoyed travelling up to Finn Park and cannot wait to get up to Ballybofey again when restrictions allow – and the new stadium in Stranorlar when finances for opening the venue allow. 

There is always a great welcome for the travelling supporters in Donegal; there is the wonderful soup and from a Hoops perspective in recent years the results have gone Rovers way. You have to go back to November 2008 for the last Harps win over the Hoops with Marc Mukendi and Conor Gethins on the scoresheet in the 2-0 victory in Finn Park.

Cementing the relationship of good will of course is Finn Harps’ role last season in handing Shamrock Rovers the title. Yes, the Hoops went through the COVID-19 shortened season unbeaten, conceding just seven goals and keeping 13 clean sheets in the 18 games but it was a Finn Harps win in November that got Rovers over the line to confirm the league title – even better from a Rovers perspective was that Harps’ crucial win was against Rovers’ rivals Bohemians.

Harps had lost 12 in a row in Dalymount Park but came up trumps that night. I was probably the only Shamrock Rovers supporter who was present to see Rovers win the league. I was in the Phibsborough venue reporting for extratime.com. Come the final whistle I was thankful of the mask I was wearing so I could have some semblance of neutrality as people couldn’t see the wide grin going across my face as Rovers had secured their 18th league title.

Aaron McEneff described the scenario on the night when I spoke with the former Rovers man recently. “I was sitting at home and looking at the Bohs v Finn Harps game on WatchLOI. The Finn Harps ‘keeper had a stormer pulling off great saves. Around the 75 minute mark with Harps 2-0 up and Bohs down to ten men, our players WhatsApp group slowly started to take off. When it got to 85th minute, I had the drinks open. We then went on FaceTime with the lads to celebrate.” The Hoops Head Coach Stephen Bradley wasn’t even watching that night and was only alerted to what was unfolding thanks to his assistant coach Glenn Cronin messaging him with ten minutes to go.

The 2-0 win for Harps was their first win over Bohs in Dalymount Park this century and was quite a time to do it. Ollie Horgan’s men were battling to avoid relegation and the three points that night, as well as making the Hoops champions, sent one of their relegation rivals Cork City down.

Mark Russell was the hero for Harps (and the Hoops!) scoring a goal either side of the half time break. It left Harps five points behind Shels but with two games in hand and it was a gap Harps would overcome to stay up so that tonight they could welcome once again the Hoops to Ballybofey in Premier Division action.

Alan Mannus: ‘We have a style of play where we want to keep possession’

Published in Hoops Scene Issue 3/2021 (Shamrock Rovers v Longford Town – 17 April 2021)

Looking back on last season’s title winning campaign for Shamrock Rovers, the defensive statistics for the Hoops are worth highlighting. Across the 18 league campaign, the team kept 13 clean sheets and conceded just seven goals – the fewest in the history of the League of Ireland (which includes 22 seasons which were 18 game campaigns or less). In the final 11 matches of the 2020 Premier Division, the Hoops conceded just the one goal.

“It was remarkable,” said Shamrock Rovers goalkeeper Alan Mannus reflecting on the title success built on that defensive strength. “Normally when it is a team like Shamrock Rovers who are competing to win the league, you set yourself a target of 20 clean sheets over a 36 game campaign. 

“It was different last year with the season cut in half (due to COVID-19) but we had 13 clean sheets so if we had played double the games we would have had over 20. I wasn’t that busy in terms of making saves and that shows how good the team was especially the defenders but we defend from the front. Everyone contributes towards that.” 

While Mannus mentions that defending that starts with the strikers, the way the Hoops play it also works the other way – with the attacks starting from the goalkeeper. In Rovers’ recent 2-1 win over Dundalk in the last game played here in Tallaght, it was noticeable how involved Mannus was in beating the press that Lilywhites exerted on Rovers in that game.

Possession and beating the press

“We have a style of play where we want to keep possession. We have worked hard on distribution, particularly in the last few weeks. We are trying to progress with that in training as a goalkeeping team. We are working on not just hitting it to the player but to their chest or feet over an opponent rather than just close to them. I’m trying to learn to do that as a goalkeeper. 

“Previous to being at Rovers, it was usually about hitting it as far as you could into an area where you strikers can challenge for the header. It is very different now where you are trying to pick people out and maintain possession.

“The way Dundalk set up their press, I couldn’t really go to the centre half a lot of the time but that meant there was someone else who was free. We should always have an option if I can’t get to the centre half. They players need to be in certain positions to create space and then I need to recognise that and be good enough to try and get it to that player.

“I think that football is changing and evolving. You can see the way the best teams in the world play. Teams like Man City and Barcelona are playing that way for years and, while we are not comparing ourselves with them, it is about seeing can we progress with what we are doing. 

“We all know the role we have and we have a purpose to either receive the ball or create space for someone else to receive it. That puts a certain responsibility on me for where I need to be after I make a pass.” 

Rovers were made work for the win against Dundalk with Mannus pulling off a number of saves that helped the Hoops to all three points.

“In the second half I was quite busy and you’d expect that against a team like Dundalk. Any team that has players up front like Pat Hoban and Michael Duffy, they are going to cause you problems. I thought Liam (Scales), Sean (Hoare) and Lee (Grace) were excellent in front of me as a back three – they defended really well. 

“I was pleased with that save when I pushed in onto the bar even if it was offside. We were working on that thing in training during the week with Jose [Ferrer – Rovers’ goalkeeping coach] with a header that bounces around you. The main thing against Dundalk was we won and I was pleased that I was able to contribute.”

Behind closed doors

The atmosphere in Tallaght Stadium for that behind-closed-doors win over the Lilywhites was very different from a little over 12 months ago when over 7,500 fans packed into the same venue to see a Rovers 3-2 win. “You do miss the crowd especially when you walk towards the goal and the supporters are behind the goal, you hear your name being sung and we clap one another. It is different but I’m quite used to having no supporters now.

“Some players can get an edge off the adrenaline of a big crowd. I’ve always tried to be quite relaxed on the pitch. I don’t want to be pumping adrenaline too much. I want to be calm. That’s the way I want to try and play.”

The Hoops haven’t been able to have their usual gym regime with COVID-19 regulations meaning only outdoor facilities can be used. Mannus has built up his own home gym over the years and it has come into its own during lockdown. The goalkeeper feels the strength and conditioning work he has done over his career has been massively beneficial to him.

“We have an outdoor set up at Roadstone which we call ‘the rig’ and Darren Dillon does a great job organising that work for us. I also have a set up at home that I’ve had for a while. Outside of goalkeeping training, that has been the most important thing for me. There is a saying that the best ability is availability. If I look back over my time, one of the biggest things for me is that I’ve been available to play where as other goalkeepers have picked up knocks. I’ve had a few injuries along the way but I’ve missed less time over 20 years than most goalkeepers and for me it is has been through that strength training and the gym work.

“Other goalkeepers might have been better than me but they got injured and allowed me get by them in the pecking order and that is down to the training I was doing. I’ve put the time in over the years and that has helped me.” 

Gavin Bazunu

When Mannus re-joined Rovers during the 2018 season he worked closely with Gavin Bazunu who last month made his senior international debut for the Republic of Ireland. “Me and Gavin still text each other and I congratulated him when he was called up to the squad. I was delighted to see how well he has gone on to do and nothing has happened by chance for Gavin.

“The very first training session when I came back to the club, he came over to me and said ‘if you see anything that can help me, please tell me’. He was only 16 then and hadn’t played for the first team and that was really impressive to me. With a younger ‘keeper,  there are two parts as to how good they are. There is the technicality of their game and then the mental side – not just on the pitch but attitude and desire and determination to be the best. 

“Gavin had good levels of both but his desire and determination was the main thing for me. He has been excellent. He should be in the senior squad in future and not the under-21.”

We want to retain the cup that we worked so hard to win – Roberto Lopes

December 4, 2020 Leave a comment

Interview from Hoops Scene No. 11 (2020) – Shamrock Rovers v Sligo Rovers, FAI Cup semi-final, Sunday 29 November 2020

Everything about this year has been quite different including the fact that with a shortened SSE Airtricity League season due to COVID-19 the league finished up before the quarter-final stage of the extra.ie FAI Cup.  With Shamrock Rovers 2-0 down at half time away to Finn Harps in their quarter-final last week, those looking in on WATCHLOI might have felt that the Hoops had only another 45 minutes of football to go in 2020. On a miserably cold and wet night on a sticky pitch in Ballybofey, it wasn’t looking too good for Rovers. 

However the Hoops weren’t happy with letting their unbeaten run in the league and cup that goes back to August 2019 come to end. Awarded a remarkable three penalties in five minutes – with Aaron McEneff missing the first and scoring the next two – coupled with Graham Burke’s winner saw the Hoops through to tonight’s semi-final.

 “We went a goal down after 15 minutes and you are thinking this is going to be hard work,” said Roberto Lopes when he spoke with Hoops Scene this week. “Then for them to get a second one so quickly, your thoughts are we have a mountain to climb on that pitch, in the form they are in and how hard they work for one another but there was no panic. 

“The important thing was to be calm and trust what we do. We just needed to increase the energy and the tempo. We got that reaction in the second half – we got more in their face and we turned the screw and the pressure told in the end. We got our reward.

“We know that if we lose a game now, it is the season finished. It became real that Friday night in Harps – you live to fight another day or the season either ends. For me, I can’t imagine finishing the season and there are other teams still playing games. You want to be there at the end.” 

Lopes recalled that his captain Ronan Finn told his teammates that were well prepared to take on Harps in such difficult weather conditions. “Finner said it before the game that we had the best preparation of this quarter-final which was playing them two weeks before. The conditions that night were maybe worse then as there was a threat of the game being called off.

“We had to change slightly the way we played, but the principals were still there in how we attack, create chances and be patient and the opportunities will come. Having that experience of playing up there a couple of weeks ago and knowing what it was going to be like really prepared us for the game.”

The Hoops became the first League of Ireland club to go through a league campaign without a defeat since the 1920s and Rovers are focussed on retaining the FAI Cup which would also mean the club going through the full domestic season without a defeat. 

“The drive for this team is to remain unbeaten and we need to win this cup or else we will be beaten. We want to retain the cup that we worked so hard to win. The fans waited so long for Rovers to win the cup and for most of the players like myself it was the first time to win it. There is a massive motivation to win the cup and cap a great year off with a double.”

The statistics are quite remarkable for Rovers this year. In the 18 game league campaign the Hoops conceded just seven goals – the fewest ever in League of Ireland history. They kept 13 clean sheets and in the final 11 league games of the season, they conceded only one goal. 

“Defenders earn their crust on clean sheets and how well you defend. It isn’t just about getting your body in front of the ball, giving no chances up but when you have the ball can you keep it long enough so your opponents don’t get it. Can you be brave and play out from the back and through midfield without giving the opponent an opportunity to attack. That is a big part of defending – when you have the ball.

“We have such a fantastic goalkeeper in Alan (Mannus) – he gives us that confidence. 

Joey (O’Brien) is top class. We know what Lee (Grace) is capable of. In his first season at the club, there is nothing that fazes Liam Scales – he has fitted right in and been brilliant. You go through the team and we defend from the front. It is so important what Aaron Greene does for the team. The ability to win the ball high up and in midfield like we’ve done this year, it really does take the pressure off us defenders. Keeping that mentality throughout the team we will concede fewer goals.”

Lopes has played a crucial part in those clean sheets but his late goals have been invaluable too – all scored from set pieces. With Rovers trailing 2-1 to Dundalk in February, Lopes popped up with the equaliser on 71 minutes before Jack Byrne got the winner in front of over 7,500 fans in Tallaght – the last time supporters have watched a game in the stadium. Lopes got the winner nine minutes from time in the Brandywell as Rovers came from 1-0 down to win in August. In the Europa League later that month, it was the defenders’ flicked goal on 78 minutes that forced the game to extra-time before Rovers won the most remarkable penalty shootout (with Lopes scoring his side’s seventh spotkick).

“It is very important to chip in with goals throughout the team. When you have the quality of delivery with Jack Byrne, Aaron McEneff or Sean Kavanagh at set pieces you need to be scoring off them. We have great opportunities from set pieces and we work really hard on them. Goals win games and if we can chip in with a few goals between us that can make a difference. It is a team effort.”

Lopes was a half-time substitute in the 3-2 win over Finn Harps having just returned from being part of the Cape Verde squad in home and away Africa Cup of Nations qualifiers against Rwanda – both of which finished scoreless.

“It was a fantastic trip,” said Lopes. “It was professionally done. We were COVID tested four times in eight days when I was there plus the test before I left Ireland. They were really on top of it. You had a room to yourself and it was mask and hand sanitiser like here. 

“We were disappointed that we didn’t get three points in both games. There are some great quality players in the squad who are playing across the world. We are trying to qualify for the Cup of Nations – we will probably have to beat Mozambique and get something off Cameroon in the games next March. I’d love to be a part of the team who can qualify.”

It was a long journey home for Lopes with a flight from Rwanda to Uganda then a nine hour flight to Amsterdam where he had a further six hour layover before landing in Dublin the day before the game against Harps.

It has also been a journey for Lopes to win his first League of Ireland title. He was one of Stephen Bradley’s first signing for the Hoops moving across the Liffey from Bohemians. He is a player that Rovers fans mark out as one who has improved the most since his arrival in Tallaght. Playing in one of the club’s strongest ever teams, the 28-year-old defender is one of those in contention to win the club’s player of the year award.

It has also been a journey for Lopes to win his first League of Ireland title. He was one of Stephen Bradley’s first signing for the Hoops moving across the Liffey from Bohemians. He is a player that Rovers fans mark out as one who has improved the most since his arrival in Tallaght. Playing in one of the club’s strongest ever teams, the 28-year-old defender is one of those in contention to win the club’s player of the year award.

“One of the reasons I signed for Shamrock Rovers was to improve as a player. I knew my strengths coming here and I knew my weaknesses. One of the big things I said coming here is that I can learn the game. I can become a better footballer. 

“The fact that people said I couldn’t pass water when I signed here and say now that I look like a footballer, I see that as a massive complement to me. It is testament to the manager and all the coaching staff who have brought me to this level. I’ve worked really hard to learn. They have given me the tools to become the player that I have. I am still not there yet and I can improve

“Winning the league wasn’t just something we’ve been trying to achieve this season but something we have worked towards over the last number of years. It was a fantastic experience and that is my first time ever winning the league. I’ve been trying to do it over the last ten years so it was a really special moment for me. We enjoyed the night of the trophy presentation and we made sure we celebrated as it is important to do that and acknowledge what we had done.” 

A hardcopy and digital version of this programme is available to purchase from Shamrock Rovers here.

Watching LOI online and in the flesh

November 20, 2020 Leave a comment

Published in the Finn Harps match day programme – Issue 9 2020 – Finn Harps v Shamrock Rovers (1 November)

It is a Finn Harps v Shamrock Rovers game with a difference. COVID-19 restrictions mean there will be no home fans in Finn Park singing “Finn Harps, Finn Harps we are really here to stay”.

There is usually a sizeable travelling support for this fixture, with Rovers fans always made feel very welcome in Ballybofey but you won’t be hearing Hoops supporters serenading the newly crowned champions with (for reasons that are beyond me!) David Essex’s ‘Hold me close’.

However there will be plenty of football fans across Donegal, Dublin and beyond tuning in online via WATCHLOI for today’s fixture. The streaming service has been so vital for supporters since the resumption of the League of Ireland behind closed doors.

I’ll be watching this game online tonight deciding not to make the trip to Donegal but as a reporter with extratime.com I’ve been one of the lucky people to be able to attend games – and have watched matches in each of the league grounds in Dublin since August.

The added benefit of having WATCHLOI is that it streams about 90 seconds behind the live action, it has been very handy to have the stream available for action replays to make sure your match report is accurate!

The setup and organisation in each stadium I’ve visited has been very professional ensuring the safety of those in attendance and the match officials, management and players. A COVID-19 form completed ahead of match day, a temperature check on arrival, hand sanitiser available and social distanced seating in the stadium – and of course masks being worn. 

Most grounds now have an overflow press area as the press box simply isn’t large enough to accommodate the reporters and the required social distancing. In Tallaght Stadium, a new press area opposite the main stand was put in for the AC Milan Europa League qualifier to facilitate the large press core for that game from Ireland and Italy. Stickers with the reporters names were marked out on the desks. The Hoops have kept the area for the rest of this season and I’ve taken to sitting at Giovanni D’Elia’s desk in Tallaght for the past few weeks!

When St. Patrick’s Athletic played Harps behind-closed-doors in the FAI Cup in August, a number of Saints supporters made the trip to Finn Park to watch the game through the stadium perimeter fence – maybe there will be a few Rovers fans who might do similar although with heightened COVID-19 travel restrictions it might not be for the best.

One of the most memorial moments of this season for me involved fans watching another behind-closed-doors game that month. It was on a damp night in Tallaght when Rovers played Finnish side Ilves Tampere in a Europa League qualifier. In extra-time, from the pressbox you could hear the odd shout from behind the goal at The Square end of the ground. Then some more and before long out of the darkness about a dozen or so fans could be seen standing on top of the stadium perimeter wall – at one stage a few flares were lit  with smoke and song drifting into the stadium.

Those fans got to see the most dramatic of penalty shootouts. Jack Byrne missed Rovers’ first spot kick but then the Hoops scored the next dozen with Alan Mannus blasting one home before saving the 25th peno of the night. It set Joey O’Brien up to score his second penalty in the shootout for the win before the players trotted down to celebrate with the Rovers supporters – the ‘Ilves dozen’ – peering in over the perimeter wall.   

Categories: Uncategorized

Waterford for the league, Rovers for the cup

November 17, 2020 Leave a comment

From the Finn Harps v Waterford match programme – Issue 10 2020 (Monday 9 November)

Looking back five decades it was a time when Waterford were the dominant side in the League of Ireland. It was a period when the Blues won an incredible six titles in an eight seasons. This year is the 50th anniversary of Waterford completing a league three-in-a-row becoming only the second club at that time to manage that feat – equalling Cork United’s from 1940/41. Only Dundalk (2014-2016) and Shamrock Rovers (with a four-in-a-row in the 1980s) have since managed that feat since.  

Those league titles earned Waterford passage into the European Cup where they played clubs such as Vorwaerts Berlin, Galatasaray, Glentoran, AC Omonia along with a couple of European heavyweights. In 1968 they were drawn against the reigning European champions Manchester United. There were 48,000 in attendance to watch the first leg in Lansdowne road as Best, Law and Charlton took on the Blues. Law bagged a hat-trick with Johnny Matthews scoring for Waterford who would lose the second leg 7-1. In 1970 the Blues faced Celtic with Jock Stein’s side demolishing Waterford 7-0 in the first leg and 3-2 back in Glasgow after the Blues led in the second leg 2-0.

Domestically at this time while Waterford were dominating the league, Shamrock Rovers, who finished runners up in the league three years in a row from 1968/69, had effectively taken ownership of the FAI Cup. The Hoops were in the process of winning six-in-a-row playing an incredible 32 cup ties without defeat. 

The 1968 FAI Cup final saw Waterford face Rovers with the Blues favourites having won the league, Shield and the Top Four competition that season. Speaking to some of the Shamrock Rovers players who went head-to-head with Waterford in that cup final and in the league during that time, it is clear how high much esteem they hold for that Blues side.

“Not many people remember that era now but Waterford had a very talented team and played a great brand of football,” said Damien Richardson. “They were terrific. We had great respect for the Waterford team.”

Paddy Mulligan describes Waterford as “a wonderfully gifted team. We couldn’t win the league as they were winning leagues all round while we were winning the cup. That was a smashing Waterford team with Alfie Hale, Jimmy McGeough and John O’Neill.” 

The ’68 final in Dalymount had the second highest final attendance ever with 39,128 spectators squeezed into the ground. “I remember walking out from the dressing room and being absolutely astonished how full Dalymount was,” recalled Richardson. “It was mind-boggling to see it – what a crowd.”

Mick Leech scored twice for Rovers with Mick Lawlor getting the other goal and Leech is remembered for patting the Waterford ‘keeper Peter Thomas after he slotted away Rovers last goal with a minute remaining in the match.

“We went 3-0 up and he was lying on the ground,” said Leech. “I’d great respect for him as a ‘keeper and I just tapped him on the head and said ‘hard luck Tommo, maybe next year’. In some ways I’m sorry I ever did it because people got the wrong impression and thought I was taking the piss out of him. That was never the case.”

It would take a decade for Rovers to win their next cup and a further two years for Waterford who defeated St. Patrick’s Athletic 1-0 in the 1978 final. It was Peter Thomas’ only winners medal and it went with the five League of Ireland titles he won in remarkable successful period for Waterford.

Elections in Ireland to change with establishment of Electoral Commission

July 4, 2020 1 comment

Tucked away on page 120 of the programme for government is the section on electoral reform which makes for interesting reading for political nerds but does have wide ranging implications for future elections in Ireland.

How we apply to vote, how we actually vote and who are TDs are will all be effected by decisions made by the proposed Electoral Commission. The three party government states in the programme that it ‘will ensure that this Commission is in place by the end of 2021’ so it is not something that is going to be kicked too far down the road.

Election Posters
The use of the much maligned but very important election poster comes up whenever elections come around when posters adorn every lamppost across Irish towns and cities. The task of examining the use of posters will fall to the new Electoral Commission who will examine their use in both elections and referendums and will do so within 12 months of establishment of the Commission.

They will ‘consult on placing limitations on the number of posters that can be used or fixing certain locations for their use. The Government will legislate for its recommendations in advance of the 2024 Local Elections.’

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By-Elections

At present if a TD dies or resigns, a by-election has to take place to find their replacement and the Dáil must move the writ within six months of the requirement for a replacement. However, the new Electoral Commission is to examine the possibility of replacing by-elections with an alternate list system. Such a method is currently used to replace members of the European Parliament.

Currently any MEP vacancy is filled from a replacement list – this is a list compiled ahead of the election by each registered political party or independent candidate. The person who is at the top of the replacement list fills the vacancy when it arises.

Postal Votes

The issue of postal voting is in the news in relation to the upcoming US election. In Ireland the eligibility for voting via this method is very limited. The electoral commission is to examine the current use of postal voting with a view to expanding its provision.

At present in Ireland those eligible to get a postal vote are:
• Irish diplomats posted abroad, their spouse or civil partner who is living abroad with them
• Gardaí and full time members of the Irish Defence Forces

In addition if voters cannot go to a polling station, then can apply for a postal vote. This is for those who:
• have a physical illness or disability
• are studying full time at an educational institution in Ireland, which is away from the home address where you are registered
• cannot vote at local polling station because of their occupation, service or employment
• are in prison.

Election Register
Currently the election registers are controlled by each local authority. The plan is for the Electoral Commission to update and maintain a single national electoral register database and they will also look to move the registration option online.

Parental leave
At present there is no parental leave for elected members of the Houses of the Oireachtas. The commission is to ‘develop supports and alternatives for members of the Oireachtas to take parental leave.’

Equality and Diversity
Away from the section on the Electoral Commission, the programme for government also notes that the new government will ‘introduce practical measures that will encourage more women to stand in local elections in 2024’.

They will also require ‘local authorities to be more flexible with meeting times and to use remote working technologies and flexible work practices to support councillors with parental or caring responsibilities, including childcare, and reduced travel times and absences from work.’

The plan is also to ‘examine further mechanisms informed by best practice internationally to encourage political parties to select more women for the 2024 local elections.’

Leaving The Liberties Lockdown

We head out of lockdown on Monday, with the revised three phase exit strategy providing a certain symmetry for what was effectively a three stage entry process back in March. It has been a long and strange time over these past few months for everyone.

Maybe I should have kept a diary to document it all. Instead I tweeted random thoughts and took plenty of photos of cats and street art for Instagram – hey whatever gets you through – so I had a flick through those posts as a prompt to pen a few thoughts on what lockdown here in The Liberties was like for me.

Phase 3 begins on Monday – 105 days after the first stage of lockdown. We knew things were serious back on 12 March when at 7am in the morning in Washington DC (11am in Dublin) then Taoiseach Leo Varadkar was giving a speech to the Irish public starting with “I need to speak to you about the Coronavirus”. Looking up from my desk in the office at that time, people were going about their daily work oblivious that this would be their last few days in the office for over three months.

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I make Leo Varadkar’s speech five days later – his unprecedented St. Patrick’s Day address – the second phase of entering lockdown. The whole thing got serious when even I was sitting on my couch that night getting a bit emotional about it all. “This is the calm before the storm, before the surge. And when it comes, and it will come, never will so many ask so much of so few.” Gulp.

A week and a bit later and it was our final phase of entry – into full lockdown. By then there was over 2,000 cases and sadly 22 deaths. Friday 27 March it was announced that “with effect from midnight tonight…everybody must stay at home in all circumstances” except for a number of situations including brief individual physical exercise within 2km of your home – no more running in the Phoenix Park for me.

This all had me so addled that at the end of that speech I did my first bit of panic shopping as I stuck my runners on, went out to the local shop just before it closed and embarrassingly this was what I brought home – that and some chips as I thought the chippers would be closed at midnight – thankfully it never came to that.

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I was lucky enough to be able to continue to work from home during this time and have that routine of a typical working day to keep me in check. I switched my usual morning commute time for daily yoga! Certainly it was a stress reliever and a help for my lower back which hasn’t enjoyed the kitchen table chair I’ve been sitting on every day!

With live sport also in lockdown what the hell was I going to do with my time. Initially I started with chronicling all my Shamrock Rovers match programmes going back to the 1990s, then I moved onto the jerseys and then I started working my way through the Rovers squad doing video interviews for the club’s social media channels!

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The videos of course allowed me to showcase my bookcases – and I also added some new books to the shelves. All told I reckon I read 16 books during lockdown. My lockdown recommendations are:

Football: Stillness & Speed, Football Hackers, Forever Young
Apocalypse now: Station Eleven, Zone One, Notes from the Apocalypse
Fiction: To Kill a Mockingbird, The Devil in the White City, Normal People

Ah yes, Normal People. What a great distraction the TV version was. Wonderfully shot, acted and soundtracked and who didn’t fall in love with Marianne or become fixated with Connell’s chain.

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As we exit lockdown, there will be things I will miss and I know that can sound a bit selfish when you think of the reasons why we went into lockdown. Such as the evening walks through the near deserted streets around The Liberties but I’m hoping to keep these strolls going post-lockdown (see previous blog post here). I will miss that time walking to the soundtrack of David O’Doherty’s hilarious Isolation podcast from Achill Island on the Second Captains podcast platform.

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There were a few weeks when the DPD driver was the person I spoke to most face-to-face as I availed of some online shopping – one of these deliveries was a hair clippers and two haircuts later I will be glad to get back to a real barbers sometime in the future.

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I got back into the habit I had long gotten out of and started watching the main evening news on RTÉ each night. And live sport on TV was replaced by live CNN in the evening with Wolf Blitzer and the Situation Room chronicling America’s woes. As the US numbers get worse with 125,000 deaths and counting, the numbers in Ireland got better and better, with thankfully no deaths recorded on some days in late June.

The outgoing government, which I had very little time for, I think deserve great credit for the excellent job of handling the crisis and they hand over to a new government just as we leave lockdown. Let’s wish them the best and not worry about what is in or out of their programme for government. Let’s not worry about a second wave, question when can we go on holidays abroad or give out about the increased traffic on the roads.

Let’s think of all those who have worked so hard over the last 100+ days to get us into the position that we can leave lockdown. Think of those who we have lost and those friends and family that have helped us get through this. Remember to wear your mask, wash your hands and be thankful of the good days that are to come.