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Golden Trip to London 2OI2

September 23, 2012 Leave a comment

Some of my London 2O12 photos put together with my video of that Golden Moment for Katie Taylor:

Golden trip to London 2OI2 from Macdara Ferris on Vimeo.

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Golden Katie Excels

August 12, 2012 1 comment

I wasn’t in the GPO in 1916, I wasn’t in Stuttgart in Euro 88 but for the rest of my years I will bore people telling them I was there in London 2012 to see Katie Taylor crowned Olympic champion. It was a truly magic experience to be in the Excel Arena to see Irish sporting history made.

I was one of probably about 8,000 Irish there that day. People wondered why there were so many Irish there, well it was because most of us took a punt about 15 months ago and applied for tickets for that specific event. In Athens in 2004 (see here), I’d bought tickets for the men’s lightweight double skulls where Ireland were favourites but failed. Robert Heffernan’s magnificent fourth place this weekend reminded me that I’d also bought tickets for the women’s 20km walk in 2004 when we thought Gillian O’Sullivan might medal and due to injury she never even made it to Athens.

Flags

This time around Katie Taylor was our medal hope. I can’t claim to have seen Taylor fight before so I haven’t been on the bandwagon that long but I was hoping to climb on it now with the destination hopefully the top step of the Olympic podium. The weight of expectation on the Bray fighter was ridiculous. Even having won the last four world championships and been the poster girl for women’s boxing in Olympics, the pressure still didn’t seem to faze her. The day before a raucous Irish crowd had cheered her on when she won her semi-final. The final was to be another step up.

The amount of Irish last Thursday meant the Excel was like a mini-Poznan except without the massive drunkenness or the poor result in the sporting event. It was the hottest ticket in town to see the first ever gold medal bouts in women’s boxing. The British were here to see if Nicola Adams could win gold for Britain. A Terrific Thursday for Team GB to go with the Super Saturday we’d seen when in London for the previous weekend (see here). We had Princess Anne as well as former England cricket captain Michael Atherton stroll right by us. The Irish threw their considerably support behind Adams who won the very first women’s gold medal and then came Katie.

2-2 after the first round, there were audible groans when the second round scores showed Taylor losing by a point to Russian Sofya Ochigava. Taylor was going to have to very much earn that gold medal. The third round saw Taylor step it up and we were hoping that the “Katie, Katie, Katie” chants along with the de rigour Olé Olé were spurring her on. Even though she led by two points going into the last round, when the final bell tolled I was very much unsure.

It was as tense an occasion I have ever felt in a sporting arena waiting for the final announcement. Pete Taylor ran a worried hand over his shaven head while Zaur Antia had to look away. Both fighters had their hand held by the referee and both had their other hand pointing to the sky as if this would influence the outcome at this stage. When they read out the final result and Taylor sank to her knees in triumph that is when the tears arrived. Ireland had won an Olympic Gold medal with Taylor becoming only the sixth person to win a gold medal for our country.

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Minutes later Pat Hickey (who else!) was on hand to present Taylor with her gold medal. We then had the once in a lifetime opportunity to sing our national anthem, Amhrán na bhFiann, and see the tricolour raised in honour of an Olympic gold medal win for Ireland. Don’t mind hairs-on-the-back-of-the-neck stuff, this was pure tears-running-down-the-front-of-the-face, for me anyway and most of the Irish in the arena.

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We didn’t want the celebrations to end and either did Taylor who broke away from protocol to grab a tricolour and go on a lap of honour around the arena as the decibel levels went higher and higher if that seemed even possible.

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We floated out of the arena after the final bout that saw 17-year-old Clarissa Shields win for the USA. A sea of green made it’s way out to the DLR, singing the Fields of Athenry as volunteers and press were taking photos of the joyous scenes below them as the watched from the balconies high above the mall in the Excel. Even the British Military personnel were getting high fived on the way out of the building. A gold medal, Katie had won a gold medal. It doesn’t get any better than that.

The tears returned again when I read Miriam Lord’s front page Irish Times article the next day:

“Please stand for the national anthem of Ireland.” The Tricolour was hoisted upwards to the top spot by naval officers in full dress uniform. 



We stood. And we sang. Never before, said the non-partisans, had they seen the like. The anthem was sung like never before, rattling the rafters, belted out, all the words, with breathtaking fervour.



Jesus, Mary and Joseph. It was spine-tingling. And then the tears came.”

Golden trip to London 2OI2 from Macdara Ferris on Vimeo.

Olympic Parklife

I’ve heard of exit through the gift shop but what about enter through the shopping centre. Well that is the way for most spectators to get into the London 2012 Olympic Park. The ‘Javelin’ train service from Kings Cross-St. Pancras, free with your Olympic ticket, takes you directly to Stratford station which is adjacent to the massive – and I mean massive – Westfield Shopping Centre which has over half a million square metres of retail space.

Having spent Saturday in Hyde Park watching the games (see here), on Sunday it was our day in the Olympic Park. We’d made ticket applications for athletics, swimming, cycling, boxing and basketball over a year ago but the only tickets we secured were for the basketball on Sunday and boxing this coming Thursday.

On arrival to the Olympic Park you are greeted by some of 70,000 Olympic volunteers and manning the security are British military personal who were all quite friendly; London 2012 probably a better posting than Afghanistan! Stratford station is at the main Olympic Stadium side of the Park and we entered there and strolled down towards the other end of the Park taking in the atmosphere, sights and taking lots of photos.

Here were all the sights we had seen on the television or some of the projects I had heard about in work; There was the Orbit, the Aquatics Centre, Athletes Village, the Copper Box and the BBC studio built on top of stacked shipping containers – very sustainable – and there was Jake Humphrey presenting the afternoon show.

We had tickets for the group games in the women’s basketball between Australia and Canada followed by USA against China. It was a near full house in the arena for the first game that the Aussies eventually won 72-63. There were some freakishly tall women on the Aussie team with 6 foot 8 inch Liz Cambage towering over them all. She was the player who earlier in the competition performed what seems to have been the first slam-dunk in women’s Olympic basketball.

I was sitting beside the father of one of the Aussie squad players so he was able to give me all the low down on the team pointing out the key players. These included three-time Olympic silver medalist, 37-year-old former NWBA player, Kristi Harrower, playing in her fourth Olympics.

The basketball arena is a very impressive venue especially given that it is only temporary and will be dismantled after the game. Here is a time lapse video of its construction if, like me, you’re into that sort of thing!

Sadly we didn’t have RTÉ’s Timmy McCarthy doing commentary for us, as there were plenty of “DOWNTOWN” three pointers during the game. However, the DJ in the venue blasted out tunes during stoppages in the game and the host down on the sideline had the spectators joining in with the fun – the best thing being the hilarious slow Mexican Wave around the venue.

The USA crushed China 114 to 66 in an amazing display of basketball – well so I thought but I don’t profess to know too much about the game – but the Americans looked quick and were ruthless in punishing any mistakes by the Chinese. USA will face Australia in Thursday’s semi final.

After the basketball, we got to sample exactly what the Olympics is about for some. We went to the megastore and bought stuff with our VISA cards in the shop adjacent to the largest McDonalds in the world. Citius, Altius, Fortius indeed.

The Olympic Park is an amazing feat of engineering located on what was one of the most contaminated locations in the UK. To get an idea of scale of the park, you could fit over 350 football pitches in it. ‘Engineering the Olympic Park’ is a great video about the construction of the Park here.

Having been unable to get tickets for the athletics, we did the next best thing and bought tickets to go up the 114m Orbit viewing tower in the evening. It was nicely times so we could watch the men’s100m semi-final as you can see the home straight from the tower. So there was Yohan Blake winning the semi-final before we were able to watch the men’s 1500m semi final too. We even got to see Mo Farah get his gold medal from his 10,000 win the previous evening. Not bad for £10 when tickets in the main stadium were going for £495 face value! The view of the Olympic Park and across London towards the Shard was breathtaking on what was a wonderfully clear London evening.

We finished our time in the Olympic Park down at the Park Live venue. This is a viewing area landscaped into the park with a giant double sided screen located in the River Lea. There is space for 10,000 spectators on either side of the water. It was a full house and probably more as fans sat on the seated areas and adjacent grass banks to watch the Blue Riband event of the games; the men’s 100m final.

During the athlete’s introduction, Usain Bolt was the most popular with Justin Gatland the least popular!. Under starters orders, the crowd fell silent as if we were in the Stadium that was located just a few hundred metres away. Bolt’s win was greeted as if it was another gold medal for Team GB as Bolt struck to win his second 100m Olympic title.

Our time in the Olympic Park was at an end. Our next Olympic venue will be the Excel Arena down in Docklands and the small matter of the women’s boxing final on Thursday. I hear we have a good chance of a medal in this one!

Hyde Park Heroes on Olympic Super Saturday

August 6, 2012 2 comments

The BBC were calling it Super Saturday and it was indeed super. Over in London for the weekend, we had no tickets for any events on Saturday, only Sunday, but that wasn’t going to stop us joining in the Olympic spirit.

Due to Shamrock Rovers’ semi-surprising short European season, my Olympic window had opened further than I thought it would. I had tried to pick up some more tickets but to no avail. The Olympic ticket portal was even more rubbish than the Euro 2012 website and that is saying something.

So Hyde Park was to be our venue for most of the day on Saturday. The women’s triathlon was taking place in the Park with the 1,500m swim in the Serpentine, 40km cycle and 10km run in and around the Park and didn’t require a ticket. We were there to cheer on Irish triathlete Aileen Morrison who has had an excellent last 12 months. We got to cheer her on but sadly not to cheer her to a medal.

There were massive crowds for the event with lots of Irish flags on display for Aileen and a great atmosphere for the early Saturday morning event. The crowd was five or six deep along the whole route with talk of several hundred thousand spectators lining the route. We got a good spot where we could hear the course commentary and see the Serpentine and a place which was also along the route that the triathletes would cycle seven times and run four times.

After the swim, there were four large groups on the road with Aileen in the third group. She always seemed to be at the front of that group but got little support and ultimately an early fall in the cycle put pay to her medal chances. British favourite Helen Jenkins was in the first group and she was right in the mix going into the final stages of the race meaning there was a great atmosphere with the home fans cheering her on. The lead group was gradually whittled down from six to five to four with eventually Jenkins dropped. In a race that lasted two hours, amazingly it came down to a photo finish with three or so centimetres in the difference with Nicola Sprigg of Switzerland claiming gold.

Hyde Park is also the location for the BT Live Fanzone with five big screens showing various Olympic sports throughout the two weeks. It is like a World Cup or European Championship fan zone but instead of England losing, Britain wins! After the triathlon, we headed there and were able to watch an amazing 45 minutes of rowing especially for the British. First up was a win for the British men’s coxless four and then there was the superb stunned reaction by the lightweight double skulls Katherine Copeland and Sophie Hasking. The pair’s post race incredulous reaction brought a tear to the eye and was in direct contrast to the utter dejection of the silver medal for Britain in the next race as they were overhauled in the last 100m with gold in sight.

Each gold medal was greeted with ticket tape propelled high above our heads with the British in the crowd jumping and dancing around. It was hard not to get sucked into the atmosphere of the occasion but there was plenty of support for all nations not just Britain. We got to see Bradley Wiggins and his gold medal as he had a chat with Johnnie Vaughan on the main stage. The home fans had seen two golds and a silver in those 45 minutes of rowing. It couldn’t get any better we thought but later that evening it would be triple gold for Team GB in athletics and the celebrations would crank up a notch.

In the evening we were back in Hyde Park to see on the big screen, Jessica Ennis’ 800m double victory lap. The British poster girl for the games won the final event of the Heptathlon in style and then led a lap of honour with all her competitors joining in as is tradition in the Heptathlete.

Almost straight away it was another gold for Britain as they won the long jump, just before the men’s 10,000m. I’d been lucky enough to be in the Stadium in Athens in 2004 (see here) to see Kenenisa Bekele’s first Olympic win over the 10km. We were now watching on the big screen wondering could he win a third in a row or could home favourite Mo Fareh make it three golds for Great Britain in less than an hour?

After 24 laps of the track, there were still six or so runners in contention for a medal at the bell. It was an amazing tense atmosphere as Farah cranked up the sprint on the final lap. With chants of “Go Mo Go!” ringing out in Hyde Park, Mo went clear in the home straight to win to deafening screams with hugs and tears all around us as more ticket tape filled the moon lit sky above us in the Park. Three golds on the track in one night – six golds for Britain in one day. It doesn’t get any better than that for Team GB.

Memories of Athens 2004

August 1, 2012 2 comments

An Olympic games just an hour’s flight away, well I was always going to take advantage of that. It doesn’t get any bigger for an event junkie like me so I’m heading over to the Olympics for a couple of days. Tickets and accommodation secured (think I’m sleeping Harry Potter style under the stairs in a friends place), it’s London 2012 here we come.

Eight years ago I travelled out to Athens for a week at the XXVII Olympiad. Like London, accommodation was pricey so a cheeky e-mail to any Greek person I could find in my company got us somewhere to stay. Our colleague moved back in with his mammy and rented out his one bed apartment for the week to three of us. Unlike this Olympics, back then, the tickets were fairly accessible and we had our choice of events in Athens. We went to some boxing, weightlifting, hockey, volleyball (and no it wasn’t beach volleyball!), rowing and athletics.

In this current Olympics we had just one competitor in the rowing and Sanita Puspure was eliminated yesterday in the quarter final. Back in 2004, there was a lot of talk about medal chances for Irish rowers especially Sam Lynch and Gearóid Towey in the light weight double sculls. By the time the day of the finals came around, our two man team were nowhere to be seen having had issues in the semi-final with making the weight and Towey battling shingles. Years of preparation in a brutally tough sport came down to being sick at the wrong time and to essentially being, to put it cruelly, too heavy for the boat on the day.

We weren’t the only Irish at the regatta in Schinias, close to Marathon, who had turned up on the expectation of seeing our country at the front of the race. There were lots of Irish flags on display and Pat Hickey was on hand to give out the medals but not to any Irish rowers as he had hoped. We got to see the Irish four man compete and they finished sixth. I remember clearly just how disappointing it was not to see an Irish medal win. Unlike being at a football match, where there are two sets of fans, here there were groups of fans with flags from a myriad of nations (Romania, Poland, Denmark, Germany, France) and they all seemed to be winning around us. Meanwhile all the Irish could do was contemplate what might of been.

We spent four nights at the amazing Olympic Stadium sitting under the Santiago Calatrava designed roof. We saw some famous victories; Kenenisa Bekele’s win the 10,000m, Hicham El Guerrouj amazing win in both the 1500m and 5000m, the mens 100m final and we were surrounded by Britons celebrating Kelly Holmes’ incredible 800m and 1500m double.

Meanwhile the Irish weren’t doing so well. Adrian O’Dwyer failed his first height at the high jump and had to sit there for the next two hours watching as his heat played out. Sonia O’Sullivan meanwhile made the final of the 5,000m but came home last. We didn’t win a medal that night but the events of the evening live long in my memory. Here is what I wrote the day after and some quotes from Sonia O’Sullivan:

We had an amazing night cheering on Sonia. Maybe it was a fitting finale to her Olympic career when she essentially got to have a lap of honour around the Olympic Stadium. With 30 minutes to the final, the Irish began to gather at the 250m mark. About 100 of Sonia’s Green Army including many of O’Sullivan’s fellow Irish Olympians cheered her from start to finish. In fact the noise got louder and louder with each lap so by the time she still had one lap to go and the Ethiopian athlete had already won, the whole stadium joined in.

Ireland is the gold medal winner for glorious failures and there will be no other athlete in this games that will get the reception she got. Everyone sung themselves hoarse with plenty of Olé Olés and Fields of Athenry. All the Irish knew we were witnessing the final Olympic race of our greatest every athlete.

As she came by us on the final corner there was a wry smile, a wave and then a kiss blown in the direction of the Irish support. It brought tears to the eyes. Better than a bronze medall…well maybe not! Sometimes I wonder how we would react if we actually won a medal.”

Sonia O’Sullivan (Sunday Tribune): “When I saw it back, that moment when I blew a two-handed kiss to the Irish in the crowd took me by surprise. It put a lump in my throat to see it. It was a spontaneous thing.

Being lapped was an indignity I’d never experienced before. There was only one thing that kept my legs going during those long, lonely laps and that was the encouragement I got from the Irish crowd at the top of the home straight. The only thing I wanted to at that stage was to walk off the track or at least find a hole in it so I could disappear. Yet every time I came around to that top corner, I heard the noise and I thought, ‘Well, if they’re staying, I’m staying.’”

So in Athens we ultimately came away with no medals despite certain expectations. Cian O’Connor would win gold and then have that stripped from him and his horse that failed a drugs test. The closest the Irish maybe got to a winner was Father Neil Horan’s unwanted interruption at the conclusion of the men’s marathon.

For this London 2012 games, the optimistic talk now is of medals in the sailing and the boxing. The expectation on Katie Taylor is immense and not to add to the pressure but I do have tickets for the women’s boxing final! Hopefully Taylor can join O’Sullivan as an Olympic medal winner in front of what will no doubt be a huge Irish contingent in the Excel Arena next week.