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Elections in Ireland to change with establishment of Electoral Commission

July 4, 2020 1 comment

Tucked away on page 120 of the programme for government is the section on electoral reform which makes for interesting reading for political nerds but does have wide ranging implications for future elections in Ireland.

How we apply to vote, how we actually vote and who are TDs are will all be effected by decisions made by the proposed Electoral Commission. The three party government states in the programme that it ‘will ensure that this Commission is in place by the end of 2021’ so it is not something that is going to be kicked too far down the road.

Election Posters
The use of the much maligned but very important election poster comes up whenever elections come around when posters adorn every lamppost across Irish towns and cities. The task of examining the use of posters will fall to the new Electoral Commission who will examine their use in both elections and referendums and will do so within 12 months of establishment of the Commission.

They will ‘consult on placing limitations on the number of posters that can be used or fixing certain locations for their use. The Government will legislate for its recommendations in advance of the 2024 Local Elections.’

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By-Elections

At present if a TD dies or resigns, a by-election has to take place to find their replacement and the Dáil must move the writ within six months of the requirement for a replacement. However, the new Electoral Commission is to examine the possibility of replacing by-elections with an alternate list system. Such a method is currently used to replace members of the European Parliament.

Currently any MEP vacancy is filled from a replacement list – this is a list compiled ahead of the election by each registered political party or independent candidate. The person who is at the top of the replacement list fills the vacancy when it arises.

Postal Votes

The issue of postal voting is in the news in relation to the upcoming US election. In Ireland the eligibility for voting via this method is very limited. The electoral commission is to examine the current use of postal voting with a view to expanding its provision.

At present in Ireland those eligible to get a postal vote are:
• Irish diplomats posted abroad, their spouse or civil partner who is living abroad with them
• Gardaí and full time members of the Irish Defence Forces

In addition if voters cannot go to a polling station, then can apply for a postal vote. This is for those who:
• have a physical illness or disability
• are studying full time at an educational institution in Ireland, which is away from the home address where you are registered
• cannot vote at local polling station because of their occupation, service or employment
• are in prison.

Election Register
Currently the election registers are controlled by each local authority. The plan is for the Electoral Commission to update and maintain a single national electoral register database and they will also look to move the registration option online.

Parental leave
At present there is no parental leave for elected members of the Houses of the Oireachtas. The commission is to ‘develop supports and alternatives for members of the Oireachtas to take parental leave.’

Equality and Diversity
Away from the section on the Electoral Commission, the programme for government also notes that the new government will ‘introduce practical measures that will encourage more women to stand in local elections in 2024’.

They will also require ‘local authorities to be more flexible with meeting times and to use remote working technologies and flexible work practices to support councillors with parental or caring responsibilities, including childcare, and reduced travel times and absences from work.’

The plan is also to ‘examine further mechanisms informed by best practice internationally to encourage political parties to select more women for the 2024 local elections.’

Leaving The Liberties Lockdown

We head out of lockdown on Monday, with the revised three phase exit strategy providing a certain symmetry for what was effectively a three stage entry process back in March. It has been a long and strange time over these past few months for everyone.

Maybe I should have kept a diary to document it all. Instead I tweeted random thoughts and took plenty of photos of cats and street art for Instagram – hey whatever gets you through – so I had a flick through those posts as a prompt to pen a few thoughts on what lockdown here in The Liberties was like for me.

Phase 3 begins on Monday – 105 days after the first stage of lockdown. We knew things were serious back on 12 March when at 7am in the morning in Washington DC (11am in Dublin) then Taoiseach Leo Varadkar was giving a speech to the Irish public starting with “I need to speak to you about the Coronavirus”. Looking up from my desk in the office at that time, people were going about their daily work oblivious that this would be their last few days in the office for over three months.

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I make Leo Varadkar’s speech five days later – his unprecedented St. Patrick’s Day address – the second phase of entering lockdown. The whole thing got serious when even I was sitting on my couch that night getting a bit emotional about it all. “This is the calm before the storm, before the surge. And when it comes, and it will come, never will so many ask so much of so few.” Gulp.

A week and a bit later and it was our final phase of entry – into full lockdown. By then there was over 2,000 cases and sadly 22 deaths. Friday 27 March it was announced that “with effect from midnight tonight…everybody must stay at home in all circumstances” except for a number of situations including brief individual physical exercise within 2km of your home – no more running in the Phoenix Park for me.

This all had me so addled that at the end of that speech I did my first bit of panic shopping as I stuck my runners on, went out to the local shop just before it closed and embarrassingly this was what I brought home – that and some chips as I thought the chippers would be closed at midnight – thankfully it never came to that.

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I was lucky enough to be able to continue to work from home during this time and have that routine of a typical working day to keep me in check. I switched my usual morning commute time for daily yoga! Certainly it was a stress reliever and a help for my lower back which hasn’t enjoyed the kitchen table chair I’ve been sitting on every day!

With live sport also in lockdown what the hell was I going to do with my time. Initially I started with chronicling all my Shamrock Rovers match programmes going back to the 1990s, then I moved onto the jerseys and then I started working my way through the Rovers squad doing video interviews for the club’s social media channels!

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The videos of course allowed me to showcase my bookcases – and I also added some new books to the shelves. All told I reckon I read 16 books during lockdown. My lockdown recommendations are:

Football: Stillness & Speed, Football Hackers, Forever Young
Apocalypse now: Station Eleven, Zone One, Notes from the Apocalypse
Fiction: To Kill a Mockingbird, The Devil in the White City, Normal People

Ah yes, Normal People. What a great distraction the TV version was. Wonderfully shot, acted and soundtracked and who didn’t fall in love with Marianne or become fixated with Connell’s chain.

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As we exit lockdown, there will be things I will miss and I know that can sound a bit selfish when you think of the reasons why we went into lockdown. Such as the evening walks through the near deserted streets around The Liberties but I’m hoping to keep these strolls going post-lockdown (see previous blog post here). I will miss that time walking to the soundtrack of David O’Doherty’s hilarious Isolation podcast from Achill Island on the Second Captains podcast platform.

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There were a few weeks when the DPD driver was the person I spoke to most face-to-face as I availed of some online shopping – one of these deliveries was a hair clippers and two haircuts later I will be glad to get back to a real barbers sometime in the future.

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I got back into the habit I had long gotten out of and started watching the main evening news on RTÉ each night. And live sport on TV was replaced by live CNN in the evening with Wolf Blitzer and the Situation Room chronicling America’s woes. As the US numbers get worse with 125,000 deaths and counting, the numbers in Ireland got better and better, with thankfully no deaths recorded on some days in late June.

The outgoing government, which I had very little time for, I think deserve great credit for the excellent job of handling the crisis and they hand over to a new government just as we leave lockdown. Let’s wish them the best and not worry about what is in or out of their programme for government. Let’s not worry about a second wave, question when can we go on holidays abroad or give out about the increased traffic on the roads.

Let’s think of all those who have worked so hard over the last 100+ days to get us into the position that we can leave lockdown. Think of those who we have lost and those friends and family that have helped us get through this. Remember to wear your mask, wash your hands and be thankful of the good days that are to come.

Exploring 2km from home and some family history

On Tuesday 5 May I’ll be released from my #2kmfromhome zone into the #5kmfromhome zone. I’ve been content to stick within the 2km zone since the rules came in, as we all know they are for a very good reason. I’ve enjoyed exploring the good – including some family history – and I suppose the bad of the area I live in during the lockdown as I reflect on the last number of weeks.

I feel lucky living in The Liberties being close to Dublin’s city centre with plenty of history, street art and sunsets over the canal to take photos of during exercise taken all within 2km from my home. It is nice to see neighbours – while social distancing – out chatting as they sit on their stoops or on a kitchen chair at their front door. There are plenty of signs and pictures in the windows supporting the frontline workers.

However, the lack of green space in the city centre has become even more apparent since the restrictions came in and I couldn’t use my usual running route through the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham, and beyond 2km to the War Memorial Gardens and on into the Phoenix Park. The closing of the Royal Hospital annoyed me until it was pointed out that the OPW were facilitating the area close to James’ Hospital for a morgue to deal with the covid-19 crisis.

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So my recent running routes a couple of times a week have been north to Grangegorman or along the canal to the south. Running east into the city centre in the evenings hasn’t been too enjoyable due to the bizarre atmosphere on the deserted Dublin Streets. Many shops are boarded up or their stock removed from the premises. Those on the streets are typically Gardai, Deliveroo “staff” and people whose homes are those streets.

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The fact there are so many homeless people isn’t a COVID19 issue, but reflects the Ireland that we live in and how successive governments haven’t managed to solve this issue and the overall housing crisis. The global pandemic has wrought so much grief but has given us things that we should always have had – a single tier health service, proper rent control and finally a contraflow bike lane on Nassau Street. It didn’t need a global pandemic for us to get these things or to reaffirm that Air BnB properties were sucking the life out of the rental market in the city.

My favourite place for an evening run or walk is through the Tenters with its picturesque housing built in in the late 1910s and early 1920s. The houses were built by the Dublin Corporation in response to a housing crisis in the city at the time. Following the collapse of tenement buildings on Church Street – a tragic event which saw seven people killed and hundreds left homeless – the subsequent public inquiry highlighted the horrific housing conditions in Dublin at the time.

There is a stone marking the entrance to the area erected that reflects the history of this part of Dublin where the Huguenots, escaping religious persecution in France, settled in and set up an industrial zone for weaving.

“This area is known as the tenters, because linen cloth was stretched out on tenterhooks to bleach in the sun. When the linen trade failed, the fields were used for market gardens.”

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The fields are long gone, replaced by a lovely mix of houses including some picturesque red brick, two up-two down houses along Danore Road and Hamilton Street. I’ve taken to running down the latter road in particular as it was where my great grandfather lived. Padraig Breathnach worked for Elliots as a weaver in an industry that employed as many as 5,000 people in the early 1800s but when higher taxes were imposed from London the industry declined. By the 1900s there few looms working in the area and my great grandfather became known as last silk weaver in The Liberties working on a loom downstairs in his house on Hamilton street.

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I’m told he used to travel from the area over to Grangegorman to gather the silk from the mulberry bushes for his weaving so it seems I’ve been following in my great grandfather’s footsteps over the last few weeks as I’ve ventured from the Liberties across the Liffey and into Grangegorman and back.

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Out for the Count – tales from the tally

IMG_3514It was a two legged dramatic affair that occupied my time last weekend. The 2019 local election count was a tense long drawn out event. It had the feel of a finely balanced cricket test match, building to a dramatic conclusion and with a set of count results that actually look a lot like a cricket scorecard.

First Leg

It was an all-ticket occasion in the RDS on Saturday morning for the first leg while the second leg was fixed for the rest of the weekend beside the 18th green of the golf course at the Citywest hotel. The tallywomen and tallymen were queuing outside Simmonscourt well before doors opened on Saturday and the fun that awaited them in the Funderland venue.

Tally
The importance for the political parties of having an accurate tally, enabling an accurate percentage of vote for each candidate in each individual box, was shown by the fact that the tally was a shared effort in most constituencies – carried out by a combination of all the parties.

So Sinn Fein (SF) came together with Fine Gael (FG), with People before Profit (PBP), Labour Party (Labour) and Social Democrats (SocDems), along with a combination of the Greens and Fianna Fail (FF) to carry out the tally together.

When the count began at 9am, the boxes were tipped out by the count officials onto the desks and somewhat of a hush descended on the venue – almost like the quiet of when a kicker is lining up a conversion across the road in Leinster’s home venue.

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As I shuttled tally sheets for the Blackrock Ward of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council back to the designated party official who did the entry on the tally spreadsheet, I could see which way it was going in our Ward. It would turn out to be a massive 20 percentage point increase for the Green party in the area, with Seafra O’Faolain (Green) getting 25% of the vote and, along with Marie Baker (FG) and former Government Minister Mary Hanafin (FF), he would be elected on the first count

By noon we had a first count tally but we wouldn’t get an official first count for another 12 hours. That was because the local election ballot papers were then moved out to Citywest and they wouldn’t begin the count till late afternoon.

Second Leg

The officials in Citywest began by sorting out the ballots into a pigeon hole for each candidate at 5pm. A pair of count officials, armed with pencil, cardboard, elastic bands, sponges, and rubber thimbles, counted the votes out for each candidate and cross checked each other’s count.

Spoilt
Close to 11pm, the candidates and their election agents gathered around the spoilt votes and debated their inclusion with the retuning officer. There were 261 spoilt votes including 83 blank ballot papers. After this was concluded the first count was declared with three candidates elected just before midnight. The count was suspended and we headed home, set to return in nine hours time.

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The second count in the morning was the distribution of the massive surplus of 1,336 Green votes. With no additional candidates reaching the quota after that distribution, and Baker’s surplus of 309 being greater than the gap between the two lowest candidates that is then distributed next. Nobody hits the quota again, so out goes Gráinne Ferris of Sinn Fein (no relation), then the Independent Jacob Chacko is eliminated.

I note down each count on my clipboard and with the other Labour party members we pour over the numbers. Our candidate Deirdre Kingston is sitting seventh in this six seat ward, 118 votes behind the third FG candidate Rebecca Molloy. We think there are enough votes behind us that if we can stay ahead of Sinéad Gibney (SocDems) and Lola Hynes (PBP), as they are eliminated we can jump ahead of Molloy and retain the Labour seat held in Blackrock since 1991.

Recheck
With just six votes separating the SocDems and PBP, Hanafin’s 54 votes she received above the quota in the first count are set to be distributed. It looks like PBP are going out so they look for a recheck.

The count grinds to a halt for a couple of hours while this is done. We look at where the transfers are going and a rough tally looks like Labour will benefit significantly more than FG but SocDems will also pick up considerable transfers.

The Taoiseach strides through the count centre as I’m busy trying to keep people updated on about four WhatsApp groups, on twitter (including two sets of DMs) and the odd phonecall back to my Mum who wants to be informed of all moves.

Rocky Road
We munch on some sambos and rocky road cake that someone has brought in for us and the tensions begins to build. Everyone has their own way of dealing with things. I keep looking at the numbers scribbled out in front of me, hoping they will arrange themselves clearly into a pattern that will take us safely home. Others can’t stand still.

PBP gain two more votes in the recheck and are not pleased when the Returning Officer says she is happy with the check and is moving on with the next count. There is talk of a full recount at the conclusion of all counts – thankfully that doesn’t come to pass. Around us other counts come to a conclusion including in Dún Laoghaire where Maria Bailey’s Dad John is returned to the council but the Blackrock count goes on.

I watch the distribution of the 869 PBP votes. The SocDems get a decent chunk of them (314) and I see FG get very little. Okay, I do the sums. We just need 206 votes to keep ahead of the SocDems. I walk over to where the Labour votes are and my heart sinks.

Throughout the count they bundle the votes in piles of 100 so your eye gets accustomed to noting what 100 votes looks like. There doesn’t look to be two bundles here. I keep hoping a few more votes will come from the pigeon boxes but no. There are only 173 additional votes added to our score. We start to discuss our exit strategy.

What I’ve failed to notice though is just how few votes FG have received. Just 29 have come their way which means it is the third FG candidate who now sits last in the count and is eliminated by 23 votes. We remain 33 votes behind the sixth seat position.

The more experienced heads in the Labour camp run some quick estimates and reckon the distribution of the 1,133 FG votes will be enough to elect Barry Ward (FG) to the fourth seat, with a surplus that will see Kate Feeney (FG) and Deirdre Kingston home on the final count.

Ward claims 743 of those distributed votes to go over the quota. FF get 125, Labour 61 and the SocDems 49. The gap has narrowed to 21 votes and if that proportion transfer continues from Ward’s surplus of 628 that will be enough for us.

Ninth Count
I stay by the SocDem table and see them get 45 votes from that surplus. That means we need to get 66 votes or more for Deirdre to be elected. I scramble around to the table that has the Labour votes and I see a pile of votes that is in excess of 100. I now know that we have this.

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The count official reads out the results a bit after 9pm and the cheers ring out for the elected candidates. Elsewhere in City West they are packing up the tables and chairs but we don’t care. We head to the restaurant for a very late meal and a well deserved celebratory drink or two having felt the full drama of democracy in action over the last two days.

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Where has all the music gone? How podcasts have taken over my ears

September 18, 2017 Leave a comment

The Dublin Podcast festival runs from 19 to 30 September and I’m looking forward to taking in a couple of shows beginning on Tuesday night with Criminal and the Memory Palace at Vicar Street.

 

Over the last few years Podcasts have slowly pushed new music out of my life. Gone are the days of listening to music around the house, as the spoken word has mostly stepped in instead. Now live shows for me aren’t gigs in the Olympia but live recordings of podcasts in the Sugar Club, The Irish Times Office on Tara Street or the Liberty Hall Theatre.

 

Music is squeezed into background noise when reading a book but the soundtrack to breakfast, the lunchtime stroll and cooking dinner is 99% Invisible, the Off the Ball Football show or Tales from the East Stand.

 

The Friday night drive to a match is spent trying to squeeze the last of the League of Ireland podcasts in. A Sunday run in the Phoenix Park is with the latest episode of An Irishman Abroad. I’ve even been known to appear on a podcast – The Extratime.ie Sportscast.

 

So many podcasts and so little time and so my podcast App of choice is Overcast. With their smart speed option shortening silences, the App tells me I’ve saved 103 hours since I began using it. If you really want to you can “show the number of unfinished episodes on Overcast’s icon to add stress to your life” but I chose not to.

 

With all this and the podcast festival in mind, I kept a record of what I listened to over the last week. So read and listen on if you want some recommendations on sport, politics, Trump and the wonderful world of design – you may have to sit through some ads for Blue Apron, Square Space and MeUndies.

Monday 11 September

A mixture of sport and US politics are on the podcast menu as I start the week as I mean to continue.

 

The Cycling Podcast is a weekly show covering the professional sport. However, during the three Grand Tours they do daily shows from the Giro, Le Tour and Vuelta. The very knowledgeable contributors Richard Moore, Lionel Birne and Daniel Friebe give great insight into the pro ranks. They also have a monthly Podcast Féminin show covering the stories from the women’s peleton.

 

I also subscribe to their Friends of the Podcast series which for just £10 gives you brilliant bonus episodes on a monthly basis. Some topics this year were 15th Time Lucky (How Aussie Mat Hayman won Paris Roubaix), 1987 Giro according to Stephen Roche (I came away thinking Roche was one sneaky cyclist!) and Inside the team-car with Cannondale Drapac (a dramatic day on the rod on an Alpine stage in the Tour).

 

The New Yorker Politics and More Podcast show hosted by Dorothy Wickenden across its weekly 20 minute episodes looks to discuss the major issue in American politics of the week.

Tuesday 12 September

I’m a big fan of Second Captains. Their two episodes on Monday are free but for content across the other midweek days, you must join me and the other 8,300 or so patrons behind their Patreon paywall. The monthly subscription is $5 plus VAT with exchange rates at the moment works out at €5.67. Well worth it for the wide range of topics covered by “the boys who never go home”. However Ken Early’s monthly political podcast alone is worth the money. You also have the option of dropping out for a month which I did in July as there wasn’t any live football to discuss and I wanted to avoid wall-to-wall GAA.

 

I dip in and out of Crooked Media’s Pod Save America which is a “no bullshit conversation about (American) politics”. The show is hosted by a merry band of former Obama staffers – Jon Favreau, Jon Lovett, Dan Pfeiffer and Tommy Vietor. This week’s episode was superb as they had 45 minute interview with Hillary Clinton. The former US Presidential candidate was ubiquitous this week across all American podcast platforms – she popped up on my feed from NPR and Longform. However her best interview was later on in the week – see Saturday.

 

Wednesday 13 September

By the middle of the week, the podcasts are beginning to drop quickly into the playlist including two of my favourites.

 

99% invisible is worth listening to just for host Roman Mars’ marvellous mellifluous voice. The show covers the topic of design in short weekly 20 minute episodes. Some classic episodes are Sound of Sport and Structural Integrity. There is loads of great content on their website too.

 

Another US political podcast but this one is a bit different. The West Wing Weekly is an episode-by-episode discussion show of the Aaron Sorkin’s US hit TV show from the 2000s. You watch an episode a week and Joshua Molina (who starred in the show in the latter years) and Hrishikesh Hirway (Song Exploder – see ‘Best of the Rest’ below) dissect it in detail with actors and writers from the show. They’ve just finished season three so “What’s next?”

 

Thursday 13 September

You don’t have to be a Hoop to enjoy Tales from the East Stand but it helps. Gary Parsons and Karl Reilly take a sidewise looks at all things Shamrock Rovers each week. It is required Rovers listening. Check out the Pat Flynn monthly madness episode, I’m sure Cristiano Ronaldo has had a listen to it.

 

If the American 2016 election had been positive in any sense, it has been to raise my knowledge of politics in the US. While we might have President Bartlett over on The West Wing Weekly, we counter balance that with Donald J. Trump on Slate’s Trumpcast. With episodes every couple of days, the 20 minute show covers the Donald in great detail include a review of Trump tweets read out hilariously by John Di Domenico.

 

Irish Independent sport journalists Johnny Ward and Daniel McDonnell host the LOI Weekly hour long podcast. They could just as easily end up discussing Johnny Dunleavy’s love life and the North Korea situation at Bray as well as the usual relegation discussion.

 

Friday 14 September

I’ve subscribe to Slate Plus which for $30 gives me add free episodes across the whole range of Slate podcasts. There is also bonus content on podcasts such as the excellent weekly Political Gabfest with David Plotz, John Dickerson and Emily Bazelon.

 

The Off the Ball Football show is one I sometime listen to live on Newstalk or pick up the best bits on Podcast. The show during the week on the Clough Revie rivalry and their famous BBC interview was brilliant radio.

 

Saturday 15 September

If you want to know what the hot topic on Joe Duffy was during the week, then Playback is for you. The show goes out on RTE Radio early on Saturday morning but the podcast is always up quickly and showcases the wide range of excellent content covered by the national broadcaster during the week. It is thankfully a George Hook/Ivan Yates/Paul Williams free zone.

 

They’ve recently split The New Yorker Radio Hour into two shorter shows. This week’ first episode was a beautifully short episode on origami while the second one was an interview with Hiliary Clinton. Amazing to hear her talk about her personal dealings with Vladimir Putin.

 

Sunday 16 September

The Irish Times Worldview this week was also covering American politics with an interview with former Barrack Obama speech writer Cody Keenan. Some weeks you can be in China, other week’s Venezuela or maybe France.

 

And finally Jarlath Regan’s An Irishman Abroad is a great way to round out a week of podcast listening. Regan’s large range of interviews are with the great and the good of Irish sport, music and drama. You’re a cold person if you can’t listen to his show about donating a kidney to his brother and not have a tear in your eye!

 

 

Best of the Rest

The Irish Times Inside Politics – Damien English was on this week so I gave it a skip.

Off the Ball Panel Show – Usually a cracking listen unless it is a GAA panel.

Off the Ball Paper Review – A look across the Sunday’s sportspages

Song Exploder – Listen to musicians take their song apart and piece by piece tell the story of how it was made. Check out: The National – Sea of Love

WTF with Marc Maron – Take deep dive into the back catalogue of interviews. The Barack Obama one is brilliant!

 

Posters, Posters, Posters – everywhere!

February 13, 2016 2 comments

Did you wake up one day earlier this month, open your curtains and be confronted by a general election candidate staring in your window? Okay, not an actual candidate but maybe a poster of them hanging off a lamppost outside your house? The answer for many is yes.

Go outside your door since last week and it is a sea of posters that confronts you. Posters, Posters, Posters. Everywhere. Most people hate them but for this political anorak they are a wonder!

 

Election Called

Being part of a political family means I’ve been involved in a fair few election campaigns and poster battles. As Enda stood up in the Dáil to tell us the other week he was off to meet Michael D in the Park, I got a text from my Mum saying “Election called, your country needs you”! Since I was on holidays I wasn’t able to answer this initial Ireland’s call and for the first time since 2002, I wasn’t up a lamppost on the day the election was called.

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Arriving back into Dublin later in the week, I was like a kid venturing out into freshly fallen snow, looking in wonder at the election posters on the lampposts as I came from the airport in Dublin Bay North, into Dublin Central and into Dublin South Central. I tried to take in the picture perfect poster blitz on the journey!

 

From cardboard to corriboard

I’m old enough to remember the old school election poster which was printed on stiff cardboard, generally with just the names of the candidates for that party. A heavy spell of rain and these would soon be on the ground.

 

Nowadays the posters are printed on corriboard and cost around €6 a pop. In a previous election one party had the corrugations vertical and with a heavy gust of wind they would concertina dropping to the ground. Stability is the key for the election poster and horizontal is more stable! The name and address of both the printer and publisher of the poster must be visible – usually in the smallest of fonts!

 

They are printed with holes pre-punched top, bottom and middle on large posters to allow cable ties to be strung through to fix to lampposts. I favour a back-to-back poster arrangement but some candidates have posters with writing on the back with their party name or candidate name.

 

Candidates typically will put up maybe up to 1,000 large posters and maybe a couple of hundred smaller posters later in the campaign – often diamond shaped posters – hence the larger number up on the lampposts at present and the race to get them in good positions once the election is called as space is limited.

 

The rules

The relevant local authority polices the posters during the election. They shouldn’t go up before the election is called, although a number of candidates jump the gun at every election including #ge16. Rules stipulate that they cannot be erected on traffic lights, bridge parapets, and on poles with traffic signs. They should be placed more than 2.5m above ground. There is also no canvassing within 50m of any polling station on polling day so having a poster up directly outside can often break this rule. If you go for a quick walk around your area, you will probably see each of these rules broken multiple times!

 

If posters were to be done away with the advertisers would likely welcome it, as candidates would likely end up taking out expensive billboard and newspaper adverts. Maybe people would go with some USA style small posters on their lawn rather than on lampposts.

 

 

Do posters work?

On the canvass there is a marked difference in reaction from the voter when an ordinary canvasser calls to the door and when the candidate does. The voter will often snap to attention as a candidate seemingly descends off the lamppost, to stride up and stand on their doorstep asking for a vote on election day.

 

If the election goes well, candidates can get elected on the first count but the majority under our single transferrable vote system of proportional representation get elected from transfers. Those number 2s, 3s, 4,s etc are vitally important.

 

Since 1999, the Irish ballot paper has photographs of each candidate with party logos added following the publication of the Electoral Amendment Act (2000).

 

The changing constituency boundaries also mean that posters give voters a good idea of who is running in their area. So basically each candidate is essentially marking their territory on lampposts!

 

Having branded your constituency with posters for weeks, candidates are hoping that it will help the voter to pick them out of a very busy ballot paper and help get them over the quota in the later counts.

 

 

 

 

Post-election poster removal

When election day is over the posters need to come down within seven days. There was one campaign I was involved in where some of our posters were removed by persons unknown ahead of polling day, only to magically re-appear more than a week after the election with some €150 fines to follow :(.

 

Losing candidates can’t take their posters down quick enough while some victorious candidates will affix a “Thanks” sign on their posters!

 

Certainly the winning candidates are more likely to leave their posters up as long as possible basking in the glory of a successful election campaign!

 

No man’s land

September 22, 2011 Leave a comment

I’ve taken to cycling home along the Liffey this week to see if I can spot the man living in the Liffey. I haven’t spotted Fergal McCarthy yet but his island with his tent and two trees is still floating in the Liffey as part of Dublin’s fringe festival. If you haven’t seen it yet get down to have a look before it floats away on Sunday 25th.

For more see here: http://fergalmccarthy.blogspot.com/

Docklands developments – of sorts

September 11, 2011 Leave a comment

A couple of interesting sights in the Dublin Docklands last week.

On the south docklands for the last week or so, a timber creation was being developed in Grand Canal Dock. The strange construction turns out to be a desert island being constructed as part of the Dublin Fringe Festival. Seems like Dublin will have a new one bedroom apartment except this time it will be a floating island with its creator Fergal McCarthy living on it during the festival.

“After the huge success of last year’s LiffeyTown, artist Fergal McCarthy returns with a new art installation in 2011. A desert island will appear overnight in the midst of the Liffey. ” More details are available on the festival’s website (http://www.fringefest.com/event/no-mans-land) and Fergal McCarthy’s blog.

The two island halves being brought through Grand Canal Dock

Liffeytown (2010 Fringe Fest)

Meanwhile in the north Docklands, it wasn’t ‘crane watch’ but ‘piling rig watch’ last week as the site behind the Namaland Anglo building had a couple of piling rigs working away. What construction project was starting in the north Docklands site? Were our flailing construction and property businesses getting a timely boost? Well not quite. It isn’t a high spec office, hotel or housing development but the pumping station for the area behind the convention centre beginning construction.

View from Upper Mayor Street

No cranes remain

Macdara Ferris: “‘And when the Celtic Tiger saw the breadth of her collapse, she wept, for there were no more cranes to see.’ Benefits of being a Die Hard fan.”

This week saw the removal of the last crane in the Docklands. The south quay site off Green Street, where State Street occupies one quarter of the site, had its crane removed during the week.

The view from northside looking to the south quay with three cranes (May 2011)

View from Grand Canal Dock with State Street foreground, Nama/Carroll's/Anglo Building in background and no cranes to be seen (July 2011)

Hans Gruber: “‘And when Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept, for there were no more worlds to conquer.’ Benefits of a classical education.”

Crane Watch

Crane Update:

No cranes left on the northside

The last cranes left in the docklands sit south of the liffey above unfinished basement off Green Street


The last cranes left in the docklands sit south of the liffey above unfinished basement off Green Street

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