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Posts Tagged ‘covid-19’

Leaving The Liberties Lockdown

We head out of lockdown on Monday, with the revised three phase exit strategy providing a certain symmetry for what was effectively a three stage entry process back in March. It has been a long and strange time over these past few months for everyone.

Maybe I should have kept a diary to document it all. Instead I tweeted random thoughts and took plenty of photos of cats and street art for Instagram – hey whatever gets you through – so I had a flick through those posts as a prompt to pen a few thoughts on what lockdown here in The Liberties was like for me.

Phase 3 begins on Monday – 105 days after the first stage of lockdown. We knew things were serious back on 12 March when at 7am in the morning in Washington DC (11am in Dublin) then Taoiseach Leo Varadkar was giving a speech to the Irish public starting with “I need to speak to you about the Coronavirus”. Looking up from my desk in the office at that time, people were going about their daily work oblivious that this would be their last few days in the office for over three months.

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I make Leo Varadkar’s speech five days later – his unprecedented St. Patrick’s Day address – the second phase of entering lockdown. The whole thing got serious when even I was sitting on my couch that night getting a bit emotional about it all. “This is the calm before the storm, before the surge. And when it comes, and it will come, never will so many ask so much of so few.” Gulp.

A week and a bit later and it was our final phase of entry – into full lockdown. By then there was over 2,000 cases and sadly 22 deaths. Friday 27 March it was announced that “with effect from midnight tonight…everybody must stay at home in all circumstances” except for a number of situations including brief individual physical exercise within 2km of your home – no more running in the Phoenix Park for me.

This all had me so addled that at the end of that speech I did my first bit of panic shopping as I stuck my runners on, went out to the local shop just before it closed and embarrassingly this was what I brought home – that and some chips as I thought the chippers would be closed at midnight – thankfully it never came to that.

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I was lucky enough to be able to continue to work from home during this time and have that routine of a typical working day to keep me in check. I switched my usual morning commute time for daily yoga! Certainly it was a stress reliever and a help for my lower back which hasn’t enjoyed the kitchen table chair I’ve been sitting on every day!

With live sport also in lockdown what the hell was I going to do with my time. Initially I started with chronicling all my Shamrock Rovers match programmes going back to the 1990s, then I moved onto the jerseys and then I started working my way through the Rovers squad doing video interviews for the club’s social media channels!

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The videos of course allowed me to showcase my bookcases – and I also added some new books to the shelves. All told I reckon I read 16 books during lockdown. My lockdown recommendations are:

Football: Stillness & Speed, Football Hackers, Forever Young
Apocalypse now: Station Eleven, Zone One, Notes from the Apocalypse
Fiction: To Kill a Mockingbird, The Devil in the White City, Normal People

Ah yes, Normal People. What a great distraction the TV version was. Wonderfully shot, acted and soundtracked and who didn’t fall in love with Marianne or become fixated with Connell’s chain.

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As we exit lockdown, there will be things I will miss and I know that can sound a bit selfish when you think of the reasons why we went into lockdown. Such as the evening walks through the near deserted streets around The Liberties but I’m hoping to keep these strolls going post-lockdown (see previous blog post here). I will miss that time walking to the soundtrack of David O’Doherty’s hilarious Isolation podcast from Achill Island on the Second Captains podcast platform.

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There were a few weeks when the DPD driver was the person I spoke to most face-to-face as I availed of some online shopping – one of these deliveries was a hair clippers and two haircuts later I will be glad to get back to a real barbers sometime in the future.

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I got back into the habit I had long gotten out of and started watching the main evening news on RTÉ each night. And live sport on TV was replaced by live CNN in the evening with Wolf Blitzer and the Situation Room chronicling America’s woes. As the US numbers get worse with 125,000 deaths and counting, the numbers in Ireland got better and better, with thankfully no deaths recorded on some days in late June.

The outgoing government, which I had very little time for, I think deserve great credit for the excellent job of handling the crisis and they hand over to a new government just as we leave lockdown. Let’s wish them the best and not worry about what is in or out of their programme for government. Let’s not worry about a second wave, question when can we go on holidays abroad or give out about the increased traffic on the roads.

Let’s think of all those who have worked so hard over the last 100+ days to get us into the position that we can leave lockdown. Think of those who we have lost and those friends and family that have helped us get through this. Remember to wear your mask, wash your hands and be thankful of the good days that are to come.

Exploring 2km from home and some family history

On Tuesday 5 May I’ll be released from my #2kmfromhome zone into the #5kmfromhome zone. I’ve been content to stick within the 2km zone since the rules came in, as we all know they are for a very good reason. I’ve enjoyed exploring the good – including some family history – and I suppose the bad of the area I live in during the lockdown as I reflect on the last number of weeks.

I feel lucky living in The Liberties being close to Dublin’s city centre with plenty of history, street art and sunsets over the canal to take photos of during exercise taken all within 2km from my home. It is nice to see neighbours – while social distancing – out chatting as they sit on their stoops or on a kitchen chair at their front door. There are plenty of signs and pictures in the windows supporting the frontline workers.

However, the lack of green space in the city centre has become even more apparent since the restrictions came in and I couldn’t use my usual running route through the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham, and beyond 2km to the War Memorial Gardens and on into the Phoenix Park. The closing of the Royal Hospital annoyed me until it was pointed out that the OPW were facilitating the area close to James’ Hospital for a morgue to deal with the covid-19 crisis.

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So my recent running routes a couple of times a week have been north to Grangegorman or along the canal to the south. Running east into the city centre in the evenings hasn’t been too enjoyable due to the bizarre atmosphere on the deserted Dublin Streets. Many shops are boarded up or their stock removed from the premises. Those on the streets are typically Gardai, Deliveroo “staff” and people whose homes are those streets.

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The fact there are so many homeless people isn’t a COVID19 issue, but reflects the Ireland that we live in and how successive governments haven’t managed to solve this issue and the overall housing crisis. The global pandemic has wrought so much grief but has given us things that we should always have had – a single tier health service, proper rent control and finally a contraflow bike lane on Nassau Street. It didn’t need a global pandemic for us to get these things or to reaffirm that Air BnB properties were sucking the life out of the rental market in the city.

My favourite place for an evening run or walk is through the Tenters with its picturesque housing built in in the late 1910s and early 1920s. The houses were built by the Dublin Corporation in response to a housing crisis in the city at the time. Following the collapse of tenement buildings on Church Street – a tragic event which saw seven people killed and hundreds left homeless – the subsequent public inquiry highlighted the horrific housing conditions in Dublin at the time.

There is a stone marking the entrance to the area erected that reflects the history of this part of Dublin where the Huguenots, escaping religious persecution in France, settled in and set up an industrial zone for weaving.

“This area is known as the tenters, because linen cloth was stretched out on tenterhooks to bleach in the sun. When the linen trade failed, the fields were used for market gardens.”

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The fields are long gone, replaced by a lovely mix of houses including some picturesque red brick, two up-two down houses along Danore Road and Hamilton Street. I’ve taken to running down the latter road in particular as it was where my great grandfather lived. Padraig Breathnach worked for Elliots as a weaver in an industry that employed as many as 5,000 people in the early 1800s but when higher taxes were imposed from London the industry declined. By the 1900s there few looms working in the area and my great grandfather became known as last silk weaver in The Liberties working on a loom downstairs in his house on Hamilton street.

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I’m told he used to travel from the area over to Grangegorman to gather the silk from the mulberry bushes for his weaving so it seems I’ve been following in my great grandfather’s footsteps over the last few weeks as I’ve ventured from the Liberties across the Liffey and into Grangegorman and back.

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